If your patients have a hard time getting up in the morning and usually hit the snooze button, this article from The Huffington Post might help them understand why that’s not the greatest for their health.

When that buzzer goes off a second time, Pelayo says that your body and brain are taken by surprise, resulting in that groggy, fuzzy-headed feeling called sleep inertia. The more you snooze, the more confused your body and brain get (“So are we going back to sleep or not?!”), so you’ll probably feel more out of it even though you actually spent extra time in bed. What’s more,┬áthis type of sleep inertia can persist for up to two to four hours, research has found.

You’re throwing off your internal clock by getting up at 7:00 one day and 7:30 the next. And if you’re not waking up at the same time every day, your body doesn’t know when to start feeling sleepy, either, making you more likely to push your bedtime later and further deprive yourself of rest.