The AASM polled 2,006 people ahead of Insomnia Awareness Night to highlight the prevalence of chronic insomnia.


Summary: A new survey by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine reveals that 12% of Americans have been diagnosed with chronic insomnia. The 11th annual Insomnia Awareness Night, held on June 20, aims to raise awareness about chronic insomnia and its treatments. The recommended treatment is cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), which provides personalized strategies to improve sleep.

Key Takeaways:

  • 12% of Americans report being diagnosed with chronic insomnia.
  • Chronic insomnia can increase risks for depression, anxiety, substance abuse, accidents, Alzheimer’s disease, and type 2 diabetes.
  • Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is the recommended first-line treatment, offering personalized strategies to improve sleep and overall health.

In a new survey commissioned by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, 12% of Americans said they have been diagnosed with chronic insomnia. 

Thursday, June 20, is the 11th annual Insomnia Awareness Night, held by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine and the Society of Behavioral Sleep Medicine to drive awareness of chronic insomnia and its treatments.

“Chronic insomnia impacts not just how a person sleeps at night, but also how they feel and function during the daytime,” says Eric J. Olson, MD, president of the AASM, in a release. “Fortunately, there are effective treatment options for those who are living with chronic insomnia, and these treatments can significantly improve both health and quality of life.”

Chronic insomnia can be detrimental to physical, mental, and emotional health, negatively affecting overall wellness and daily functioning. Additionally, chronic insomnia can lead to increased risks for depression, anxiety, substance abuse, motor vehicle accidents, Alzheimer’s disease, and type 2 diabetes.

The first-line recommended treatment for chronic insomnia is cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), which combines behavioral strategies, such as setting a consistent sleep schedule and getting out of bed when you are struggling to sleep, with cognitive strategies, such as replacing fears about sleeplessness with more helpful expectations. 

CBT-I recommendations are customized to address each patient’s individual needs and symptoms. While six to eight sessions are typical, some patients improve more quickly. 

“Cognitive behavioral therapy offers patients who are experiencing chronic insomnia a highly personalized plan to help identify any underlying problems and provide long-term solutions that promote healthy sleep,” says Michael Nadorff, PhD, FSBSM, a licensed psychologist and president of the Society of Behavioral Sleep Medicine, in a release.

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